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Health Screenings

Regular exams and health screenings are key to finding diseases or conditions before symptoms begin or at an earlier, more treatable stage. Listed below are screenings you should consider to maintain your health.  

Chronic Conditions

Diabetes: Have a test to screen for diabetes if you have high blood pressure, high cholesterol or a high BMI. If you are over the age of 45 (or younger if you have a family history of diabetes), you should be screened for diabetes. These screenings are for type 2 diabetes, the most common type in adults.

Depression: If you’ve felt “down,” sad or hopeless, and have felt little interest or pleasure in doing things for two weeks straight, talk to your doctor about whether he or she thinks you should be evaluated for depression.

Sleep Disorders: If you have trouble falling asleep or staying asleep, you may have sleep apnea, which has been linked to other health problems like hypertension, heart disease and diabetes. Consult with your primary care physician, who may refer you for a sleep study.

Asthma: If you experience wheezing, coughing, chest tightness or trouble breathing, especially early in the morning or at night, consult with your physician who can determine if you have asthma.

Congestive Heart Failure: The most common signs of congestive heart failure are swollen legs or ankles or difficulty breathing. Your doctor can make the proper diagnosis and prescribe drugs and lifestyle changes to help.

Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease (COPD): Because COPD is a progressive disease, work closely with your physician to manage your condition and make lifestyle changes that will improve your quality of life and can slow the disease’s progression. Tobacco use is the most common cause of COPD. If you are a tobacco user, discuss cessation options with your healthcare provider.

For Men

Cholesterol: Have your cholesterol checked at least every five years, starting at age 20.

Blood Pressure: Have your blood pressure checked at least every two years.

Colorectal Cancer: Begin regular screening for colorectal cancer at age 50. Start earlier if you have a family history of colorectal cancer or certain diseases of the colon. Your doctor can help you decide which test is right for you. How often you need to be tested will depend on which test you have.

Sexually Transmitted Diseases: Talk to your doctor to see whether you should be screened for sexually transmitted diseases, such as HIV. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention recommends testing for HIV for those between the ages of 13 and 64.

Prostate Cancer: Men over 50 (or 45 for African-Americans and possibly age 40 in those with a family history) should be offered an annual screening that includes a prostate-specific antigen (PSA) test. Your doctor can help you understand the risks and benefits of the test and help you decide what is right for you.

For Women

Pap Smears: Have a Pap smear every one to two years between the ages of 21 and 30. If you have risk factors for cervical cancer, such as HIV infection or many sexual partners, an annual Pap smear is recommended. The test for human papillomavirus, which causes cervical cancer, is frequently done as part of the Pap test evaluation. Women over age 30 who have had three previous normal Pap smears should have a Pap smear every three years.

Cholesterol: Have your cholesterol checked at least every five years, starting at age 20.

Blood Pressure: Have your blood pressure checked at least every two years.

Colorectal Cancer: Have a test for colorectal cancer starting at age 50, earlier if you have a family history of colorectal cancer or certain diseases of the colon. Your doctor can help you decide which test is right for you.

Osteoporosis: Have a bone density test at age 65 to screen for osteoporosis (thinning of the bones). If you are between the ages of 60 and 64 and weigh 154 pounds or less, talk to your doctor about whether you should be tested. Some situations merit testing at a younger age.

Chlamydia and Other Sexually Transmitted Diseases: Have a test for chlamydia if you are 25 years old or younger and are sexually active. Talk to your doctor to see whether you should be screened for other sexually transmitted diseases, such as HIV. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention recommends testing for HIV for those between the ages of 13 and 64.

Mammography

Mammography can detect many types of breast cancer even before you can feel a lump. There has been controversy over the age at which a woman should have her first mammogram and how frequently she should have mammograms. Some guidelines suggest starting at 40, while others suggest 50. Discuss your risk and family history with your healthcare provider, who can help you determine the best screening schedule for you. Complete screening and diagnostic services are available at the OSUCCC-James, which operates the following mammography centers:

JamesCare at Macy’s, second floor, Easton Town Center. Hours: 10 a.m. to 6 p.m. Tuesday through Friday; 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. Saturday.

The Babe Zaharias Center, OSUCCC-James Cancer Hospital, 300 W. 10th Ave., Room 100. Hours: 8 a.m. to 4 p.m. Monday through Friday.

JamesCare in Dublin, Comprehensive Breast Health Services, 4019 W. Dublin-Granville Road. Hours: 8 a.m. to 6 p.m. Monday through Friday.

JamesCare at University Hospital East, Room N106, Tower 212, 1492 E. Broad St. Hours: 8 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. Monday through Saturday.

JamesCare at Martha Morehouse Medical Plaza Pavilion, 2050 Kenny Road, Suite 2500. Hours: 8 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. Monday through Friday.

Remember, you can use this information as a starting point, but it’s best to talk with your doctor about a schedule of checkups and screenings that will meet your personal needs.

Call 1-800-293-5123 for a referral to an Ohio State primary care physician or to schedule a mammogram appointment.

Make an appointment for you or someone you love today!