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Outcomes

Our Commitment

At The Ohio State University Wexner Medical Center, we provide you with quality care to help you recover quicker and with fewer complications. We regularly review this data to identify ways to improve your treatment.

What does this information mean?

This information represents the percentage of patients who received all of the recommended care based on their medical condition and individual needs.

What should you do with this information?

We share our quality data to help you make an informed decision about where to seek care for loved ones.


Neurosciences & Stroke

Despite treating patients with some of the most severe diseases and conditions, Ohio State’s Wexner Medical Center still provides quality patient care and yields excellent outcomes.

Carotidendarterectomy (CEA) and Carotid Artery Stenting (CAS) survival rates are 99.2%


Stroke Core Measures

Ohio State’s Wexner Medical Center achie​ves high outcomes in our Stroke Core Measures. These CORE measures are processes of care that have been proven to lead to better outcomes:



Stroke Core Measure Performance
 (July – November 2012)

VTE Prophylaxis

98%

Discharged on Antithrombotic

100%

Anticoagulation for A-Fib

100%

Thrombolytic Therapy

90%

Antithrombotic Therapy by Day Two

99%

Discharged on Statin Medication

100%

Stroke Education

98%

Assessed for Rehab

100%


Ohio State data includes patients seen from July 2012-June 2013.


Heart Attack (AMI)

A heart attack (also called an AMI or acute myocardial infarction) happens when the arteries leading to the heart become blocked and the blood supply is slowed or stopped.

Heart Attack Care - OSU Medical Center vs. National Average**

 98.3%
Ohio  State*
98%
National Average**

This information represents the percentage of patients who received all of the recommended care based on their medical condition and individual needs

Click here to learn what treatments are included in this score.

  • Percent of Heart Attack Patients Given Aspirin at Arrival - This measure reports what percentage of heart attack patients received aspirin within 24 hours before or after they arrived at the hospital. Aspirin can help keep blood clots from forming and dissolve blood clots that can cause heart attacks.
  • Percent of Heart Attack Patients Given Aspirin at Discharge - This measure reports how often aspirin was prescribed to heart attack patients when they were leaving the hospital. Taking aspirin may help prevent further heart attacks.
  • Percent of Heart Attack Patients Given ACE Inhibitors or ARBs for Left Ventricular Systolic Dysfunction (LVSD) - This measure reports what percentage of heart attack patients who had problems with the heart pumping enough blood to the body were prescribed ACE (angiotensin converting enzyme) inhibitors or ARBs (angiotensin receptor blockers) to improve their heart's ability to pump blood. These medicines are used to treat heart attacks, heart failure or decreased function of the heart.
  • Percent of Heart Attack Patients Given Smoking Cessation Advice/Counseling - This measure reports what percentage of adult heart attack patients are given advice or counseling to quit smoking. Smoking harms the heart, lungs and blood vessels, worsens existing heart disease and is linked to heart attacks. Quitting may help prevent another heart attack.
  • Percent of Heart Attack Patients Given Beta Blocker at Discharge - This measure reports what percentage of heart attack patients were prescribed beta blockers when leaving the hospital. Used to lower blood pressure, treat chest pain (angina) and heart failure and help prevent a heart attack, beta blockers have also been shown to reduce further heart damage.
  • Percent of Heart Attack Patients Given Beta Blocker at Arrival - This measure reports what percentage of heart attack patients were prescribed beta blockers within 24 hours of arriving at the hospital. Beta blockers are a type of medicine used to lower blood pressure, treat chest pain (angina) and heart failure and help prevent a heart attack.
  • Percent of Heart Attack Patients Given PCI Within 90 Minutes of Arrival - This measure reports how quickly patients with a clogged artery in the heart had the artery opened with percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI). PCI is also known as angioplasty, which involves a small balloon being threaded into a blood vessel in the heart to open up the clogged artery, increasing blood flow to the heart and reducing heart damage.
  • Statin Prescribed at Discharge - This measure repoprts the percent of patients who had a heart attack who got a prescription for a Statin before discharge from the hospital. Patients who shouldn’t take Statins aren’t included in this measure. drugs used to lower cholesterol. Cholesterol is a fat (also called a lipid) that your body needs to work properly. Cholesterol levels that are too high can increase your chance of getting heart disease, stroke, and other problems. For patients who had a heart attack and have high cholesterol, taking Statins can lower the chance that they’ll have another heart attack or die.
  • 30-Day Mortality Rate: No different than U.S. national rate.


Heart Failure (HF)

Heart failure is a weakening of the heart's pumping power, leading to a scarcity of oxygen and nutrients.

Heart Failure Care - OSU Medical Center vs. National Average**

  98.1%
Ohio State*
 96.7%
National Average**

This information represents the percentage of patients who received all of the recommended care based on their medical condition and individual needs

Click here to learn what treatments are included in this score.

  • Percent of Heart Failure Patients Given Discharge Instructions - This measure reports what percentage of patients with heart failure were given specific information about their condition and care when they left the hospital. This information would include education about medicines, diet, activities and important signs to watch for to prevent further or subsequent hospitalization.
  • Percent of Heart Failure Patients Given an Evaluation of Left Ventricular Systolic Function - This measure reports what percentage of patients with heart failure received an in-depth evaluation of the left ventricle, the main pumping chamber of the heart, during their hospitalization. This evaluation is necessary to prescribe the right treatment for their heart failure.
  • Percent of Heart Failure Patients Given ACE Inhibitors or ARBs for Left Ventricular Systolic Dysfunction - This measure reports what percentage of heart failure patients who had problems with the heart pumping enough blood to the body were prescribed ACE (angiotensin converting enzyme) inhibitors or ARBs (angiotensin receptor blockers) to improve their heart's ability to pump blood. These medicines are used to treat heart attacks, heart failure or decreased function of the heart.
  • Percent of Heart Failure Patients Given Smoking Cessation Advice/Counseling - This measure reports what percentage of adult heart failure patients were provided advice or counseling to quit smoking. Smoking harms the heart, lungs and blood vessels, worsens existing heart disease and is linked to heart failure. Quitting may improve a patient's condition.
  • 30-Day Mortality Rate: No different than U.S. national rate.


Pneumonia (PN)

Pneumonia is a serious lung infection that causes difficulty breathing, fever, cough and fatigue.

Pneumonia Care - OSU Medical Center vs. National Average**

 98.1%
Ohio State*
 96.2%
National Average**

This information represents the percentage of patients who received all of the recommended care based on their medical condition and individual needs

Click here to learn what treatments are included in this score.

  • Percent of Pneumonia Patients Given Oxygenation Assessment - This measure reports how many patients with pneumonia had the level of oxygen in their bloodstream measured. Pneumonia reduces the amount of oxygen carried in a patient's blood. Having enough oxygen in the blood is important to a patient's health.
  • Percent of Pneumonia Patients Assessed and Given Pneumococcal Vaccination - This measure reports how many patients 65 years and older were screened and vaccinated to prevent pneumonia. A pneumonia (pneumococcal) shot can help prevent pneumonia in the future, even for patients who have been hospitalized for pneumonia.
  • Percent of Pneumonia Patients in Intensive Care Units Who Received Blood Cultures Within 24 Hours of Arrival - This measure reports the percentage of pneumonia patients in intensive care units who had a blood culture within 24 hours of arrival. This blood culture tells which kind of medicine will work best to treat a patient's pneumonia.
  • Percent of Pneumonia Patients Whose Initial Emergency Room Blood Culture Was Performed Prior to the Administration of the First Hospital Dose of Antibiotics - This measure reports what percentage of pneumonia patients, admitted through the Emergency Department, received a blood culture before antibiotics were given. Before antibiotics are given, blood samples are taken to test for the type of infection.
  • Percent of Pneumonia Patients Given Smoking Cessation Advice/Counseling - This measure reports what percentage of adult pneumonia patients were provided advice or counseling to quit smoking. Smoking harms the heart, lungs and blood vessels and is linked to pneumonia. Quitting may help prevent pneumonia from recurring.
  • Percent of Pneumonia Patients Given Initial Antibiotics Within Six Hours of Arrival - This measure reports the percentage of adult pneumonia patients who were given an antibiotic within six hours of arriving at the hospital. Timely use of antibiotics can improve the treatment of pneumonia caused by bacteria.
  • Percent of Pneumonia Patients Given the Most Appropriate Initial Antibiotics - This measure reports how often patients with pneumonia were given the correct antibiotic for the treatment of pneumonia within 24 hours of hospital arrival. Antibiotics are medicines that treat infection, and each one is different. Hospitals should choose the antibiotics that best treat the infection type for each pneumonia patient.
  • Percent of Pneumonia Patients Assessed and Given Influenza Vaccination - This measure reports how often pneumonia patients in the hospital during the flu season (October through February) were given an influenza vaccine, if needed, prior to leaving the hospital. A flu shot can help prevent flu in the future, even for patients who have been hospitalized for pneumonia.

Surgical Care Improvement/Surgical Infection Prevention (SCIP)

Hospitals can improve surgical care and reduce the risk of infection after surgery by providing the right medicines at the right time.

Surgical Care Improvement Project - OSU Medical Center vs. National Average**

 95.9%
Ohio State*
 95.7%
National Average**

This information represents the percentage of patients who received all of the recommended care based on their medical condition and individual needs

Click here to learn what treatments are included in this score.

  • Percent of Surgery Patients Who Received Preventive Antibiotics One Hour Before Incision - Getting an antibiotic within one hour before surgery reduces the risk of wound infections.
  • Percent of Surgery Patients Who Received the Appropriate Preventive Antibiotics for Their Surgery - Certain antibiotics are recommended to help prevent wound infection for particular types of surgery.
  • Percent of Surgery Patients Whose Preventive Antibiotics are Stopped Within 24 Hours After Surgery - It is important to stop giving preventive antibiotics within 24 hours after surgery to avoid side effects and other problems associated with antibiotic use. For certain surgeries, however, antibiotics may be needed for a longer time.
  • Cardiac Surgery Patients With Controlled 6 A.M. Postoperative Serum Glucose - Even if heart surgery patients do not have diabetes, keeping their blood sugar under good control after surgery lowers the risk of infection and other problems. "Under good control" means their blood sugar should be 200 mg/dL or less when checked first thing in the morning.
  • Surgery Patients with Appropriate Hair Removal - Preparing a patient for surgery may include removing body hair from skin in the area where the surgery will be done. Medical research has shown that shaving with a razor can increase the risk of infection. It is safer to use electric clippers or hair removal cream.
  • Surgery Patients on Beta Blocker Therapy Prior to Admission Who Received a Beta Blocker During the Perioperative Period - It is often standard procedure to stop patients' usual medications for awhile before and after their surgery. But if patients who have been taking beta blockers suddenly stop taking them, they can have heart problems such as a fast heart beat. For these patients, staying on beta blockers before and after surgery makes it less likely that they will have heart problems.
  • Percent of Surgery Patients Whose Doctors Ordered Treatments to Prevent Blood Clots (Venous Thromboembolism) For Certain Types of Surgeries - This measure tells how often surgery patients' doctors ordered treatment to prevent blood clots from forming in the veins after certain surgeries. Clotting is often a concern after surgery.
  • Surgery Patients Who Received Appropriate Venous Thromboembolism Prophylaxis Within 24 Hours to Surgery to 24 Hours After Surgery - This measure tells how often surgery patients received treatment to prevent blood clots within 24 hours before or after certain surgeries. A number of factors can increase a patient's risk of developing blood clots, but doctors can order preventative treatments, known as prophylaxis, to reduce the risk.
  • Urinary Catheter Removed on Postoperative Day 1 (POD 1) or Postoperative Day 2 (POD 2) With Day of Surgery Being Day Zero - This shows the percent of surgery patients whose urinary catheters were removed on the first or second day after surgery. Research shows that most surgery patients should have their urinary catheters removed within 2 days after surgery to help prevent infection.
  • Surgery Patients with Perioperative Temperature Management - This measure shows the percent of patients whose body temperature was normal or near normal during the time period 15 minutes before the end of surgery to 30 minutes after anesthesia ended. Hospitals can prevent surgical wound infections and other complications by keeping the patient’s body temperature near normal during surgery. Medical research has shown that patients whose body temperatures drop during surgery have a greater risk of infection and their wounds may not heal as quickly. Hospital staff should make sure that patients are actively warmed during and immediately after surgery to prevent drops in body temperature.

* Ohio State data includes patients seen from April 2012 through March 2013.

** Median score for the nation's academic medical centers (University HealthSystem Consortium) — October to December 2012

Length of Stay (LOS)

Based on the past years performance, the average LOS of all patients admitted to The Ohio State University Medical Center is approximately 5.6 days. Patients' LOS may vary based on what procedure they are having as well as how sick they are when they come to the hospital. Therefore, Ohio State's Medical Center uses nationally recognized external groups to analyze patients' LOS data to determine if the LOS is appropriate. Based on this analysis, the LOS for patients admitted is "better than expected." This means that patients are kept in the hospital for an appropriate amount of time.

Learn about our Mortality/Survival data

 

 
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